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Parental Philosophies & Educational Choices

New parents often search for books and articles looking for the perfect concoction of philosophy and method to raise healthy and well-educated children. Let’s talk about some of those philosophies and educational choices.

Parenting’s Slippery Slope

In the popular parenting world for the past few decades, there has been a push to encourage good “self-esteem” in children. Articles and remedies for moms and dads have been touting the need for children to feel good about themselves… no matter what.

This has led to the comical (and sad) idea that there should be sports with no score keeping, school with no grades, and competitions with no winners. With this scenario, there has been a generation of people who have grown up confused about who they are, where they fit in, and searching for motivation to achieve.

The real way to self-esteem is accomplishment of personal goals and self-discipline. This is what must be taught for a child to truly understand the sense of their God-given worth.

In an attempt to booster self-esteem, parents have been told never to suggest that a child is doing something wrong, but that they are making an unfortunate choice. Never to train or punish, but to redirect. Never to chastise, but to only speak of the good. And where does this philosophy leave a child?

A child that has no way to win will not try to achieve. A child that has not experienced failure cannot truly experience success. They must experience the agony of defeat to really understand the thrill of victory!

Without the understanding that something is wrong, and that they have done a bad thing, they see everything as a personal choice… meaning it isn’t a bad or good choice. It is simply a lifestyle of “to each his own”. They also believe they never do wrong. They are only choosing their own path.

This philosophy has gone so far as to lead parents to believe they should not teach their children the truth of their religious beliefs, give them a curfew or bedtime, or even teach the b